Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability

Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability

Curriculum Team

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Great Learning: Measuring Student Progress through the Colorado Measures of Academic Success (CMAS)

General Assessment Information

The Colorado State Assessment System is designed to measure Colorado student’s mastery of the Colorado’s academic content standards. In December of 2009 Colorado adopted revised academic content standards progressing from early school readiness to postsecondary competencies reflective of both workforce readiness and 21st century skills.

In 2012 Colorado implemented the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to reflect changes in the state adopted academic content standards and to provide information to teachers as they began incorporating the revised content standards in their daily instruction. In 2012 Colorado became a governing member of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) consortia which is currently developing new assessments in English language arts and mathematics for grades 3-8 and high school. The PARCC assessments are scheduled for implementation in 2014-15.

New general and alternate assessments for science and social studies were field tested in 2013 and are scheduled for implementation in 2014.

The attainment of English proficiency by English Language Learner’s (ELL) is measured annually by an English Language Proficiency (ELP) assessment. In the 2012-13 school year Colorado implemented the ACCESS for ELLs® ELP assessment developed by the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) consortium.

The CO ACT assessment is designed to measure students’ preparedness for postsecondary educational opportunities and is administered to 11th grade students in April and May. Because the CO ACT is equivalent to all other ACT assessments the results can be submitted for college entrance by the student to their college or university of choice.

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The Colorado State Assessment System is designed to measure Colorado student’s mastery of the Colorado’s academic content standards. In December of 2009 Colorado adopted revised academic content standards progressing from early school readiness to postsecondary competencies reflective of both workforce readiness and 21st century skills.

The Colorado State Assessment System is designed to measure Colorado student’s mastery of the Colorado’s academic content standards. In December of 2009 Colorado adopted revised academic content standards progressing from early school readiness to postsecondary competencies reflective of both workforce readiness and 21st century skills.

In 2012 Colorado implemented the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to reflect changes in the state adopted academic content standards and to provide information to teachers as they began incorporating the revised content standards in their daily instruction. In 2012 Colorado became a governing member of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) consortia which is currently developing new assessments in English language arts and mathematics for grades 3-8 and high school. The PARCC assessments are scheduled for implementation in 2014-15.

New general and alternate assessments for science and social studies were field tested in 2013 and are scheduled for implementation in 2014.

The attainment of English proficiency by English Language Learner’s (ELL) is measured annually by an English Language Proficiency (ELP) assessment. In the 2012-13 school year Colorado implemented the ACCESS for ELLs ® ELP assessment developed by the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) consortium.

The College readiness assessment is designed to measure students’ preparedness for postsecondary educational opportunities and is administered to 11th grade students in April and May. Because the CO ACT is equivalent to all other ACT assessments the results can be submitted for college entrance by the student to their college or university of choice.

Understanding by Design (UbD)

What is Understanding by Design?

Understanding by Design (UbD) is a framework for improving student achievement. Emphasizing the teacher’s critical role as a designer of student learning, UbD works within the standards-driven curriculum to help teachers clarify learning goals, devise revealing assessments of student understanding, and craft effective and engaging learning activities.

Developed by nationally recognized educators Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, and published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), Understanding by Design is based on the following key ideas:

  • A primary goal of education should be the development and deepening of student understanding.
  • Students reveal their understanding most effectively when they are provided with complex, authentic opportunities to explain, interpret, apply, shift perspective, empathize, and self-assess. When applied to complex tasks, these “six facets” provide a conceptual lens through which teachers can better assess student understanding.
  • Effective curriculum development reflects a three-stage design process called “backward design” that delays the planning of classroom activities until goals have been clarified and assessments designed. This process helps to avoid the twin problems of “textbook coverage” and “activity-oriented” teaching, in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent.
  • Student and school performance gains are achieved through regular reviews of results (achievement data and student work) followed by targeted adjustments to curriculum and instruction. Teachers become most effective when they seek feedback from students and their peers and use that feedback to adjust approaches to design and teaching.
  • Teachers, schools, and districts benefit by “working smarter” through the collaborative design, sharing, and peer review of units of study.

In practice, Understanding by Design® offers:

  • a three-stage “backward planning” curriculum design process anchored by a unit design template
  • a set of design standards with attendant rubrics
  • and a comprehensive training package to help teachers design, edit, critique, peer- review, share, and improve their lessons and assessments.

Colorado Arts

Teaching the arts disciplines is essential to developing creativity, synergistic thinking, empathy, expression and the ability to view the world through multiple perspectives. Whether students are learning individual skills or are applying skills to enhance a collaborative ensemble, the arts demand perseverance, diligence, flexible thinking and innovation. The 21st century, conceptual age requires people who are dynamic, multi-disciplined, global thinkers which are the fundamental benefits of a comprehensive arts education.

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Comprehensive Health and PE

Comprehensive health and physical education standards incorporate a wealth of 21st century skills that are critical to making healthy choices for the lifelong success of every student. Teaching comprehensive health and physical education in every Colorado school means that students will have more opportunities to master key life skills that employers are increasingly demanding, such as teamwork, goal setting, appreciating people’s differences, managing stress, and resolving conflicts.

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Mathematics

Teaching Mathematics is essential for all students as they grow to understand their world and become productive citizens. Mathematical models explain, celebrate, and analyze the world around us; from economic models on the stock market to musical models of symphonies, our world is mathematics. All Colorado students must understand mathematics and its relevance in their lives.

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Personal Financial Literacy

Teaching Personal Financial Literacy is essential to creating fiscally responsible citizens. Our complex interconnected economy requires Colorado students develop financial decision-making skills to ensure a secure future.

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Reading, Writing, and Communicating

Teaching Literacy is essential to ensuring that all children have the skills to become successful readers, writers, and communicators with the 21st century skills required to be successful as they become post secondary workforce ready. Developing a student’s ability to read, write, and communicate is critical to their success, and directly impacts their ability to perform successfully across all content areas.

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Science

Teaching science is essential to developing an inquisitive nature about the world around us. Science provides methods and processes for investigating how things work and why things happen. Science education prepares students to be both the inventors and critical consumers of the 21st century.

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Social Studies

Teaching social studies is essential for helping students make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world. Powerful social studies education prepares students to identify, understand, and work together as an informed citizenry to solve the challenges facing our communities, states, nations, and world.

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STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics)

STEM Education provides a venue for the transformation of teaching and learning by integrating content and the skills of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Engaging students in 21st century practices through inquiry, critical thinking and reasoning, collaboration, invention, and information literacy through STEM education directly impacts their ability to succeed by mastering and transferring concepts within STEM disciplines and across all content areas.

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World Languages

In the 21st century the ability to communicate in more than one language is an essential skill for all Colorado learners. Learning multiple world languages, developing multiple perspectives and understanding other cultures are vital skills needed to both collaborate and compete in our global community. Languages link people locally and internationally. Interactions in languages and cultures introduce learners to new ways of thinking about, questioning, and interpreting the world. Through such interactions, learners acquire knowledge, skills, and attitudes that equip them for living and working in a world of diverse peoples, languages and cultures.

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English Language Proficiency

On December 10, 2009 the Colorado State Board of Education voted unanimously to adopt the World-Class Instruction Design and Assessment (WIDA) standards as the Colorado English Language Proficiency (CELP) standards. English Language Proficiency standards are required by Colorado state and federal law. The CELP standards exceed minimum legal requirements. Overall, the standards center on the English language needed and used by English Language Learners (ELLs) to succeed in school. They guide all educators who teach ELLs and help students’ access grade level academic content while learning English.

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Extended Evidence Outcomes

A strong command of academics is vital for being a successful student and ultimately a productive member of the 21st century workforce. Language, math and science skills have always been fundamental for academic and professional success. However, students in the 21st century are now facing more complex challenges in an ever-changing global society. These challenges have created the need for rigorous standards which include content knowledge and application of skills.

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Understanding Giftedness

Hayden School District has chosen to adopt the Colorado Department of Education definition for giftedness.

 “Gifted and talented children” means those persons between the ages of five and twenty-one whose abilities, talents, and potential for accomplishment are so exceptional or developmentally advanced that they require special provisions to meet their educational programming needs. Gifted students include gifted students with disabilities (i.e. twice-exceptional and students with exceptional abilities or potential from all socio-economic and ethnic, cultural populations). Gifted students are capable of high performance, exceptional production, or exceptional learning behavior by virtue of any or a combination of these areas of giftedness:

  • General or specific intellectual ability.
  • Specific academic aptitude.
  • Creative or productive thinking.
  • Leadership abilities.
  • Visual arts, performing arts, music, dance, or psychomotor abilities.

Mission:

 To recognize and nurture exceptional abilities of all gifted and talented students so that they develop high level, creative, and productive thinking, and healthy affective qualities.

 Vision:

 Gifted and talented students in the Hayden School District are identified in their strength area(s).  Educational programming is designed and implemented to maximize their potential.  Student progress and achievement are monitored through ongoing assessment.

 Beliefs:

  • Gifted ability exists and should be identified and served in students of all ages from all cultures, races, ethnic backgrounds and socioeconomic groups.
  • District administration, teachers, families, and the community share the responsibility to provide relevant and challenging opportunities to develop the individual potential of advanced learners.
  • Gifted students have unique strengths and needs that must be addressed.
  • Advanced Learners require rigorous and challenging curriculum with programming and a continuum of services to meet their exceptional needs.
  • Students should be active participants and share the responsibility for maximizing the learning opportunities provided.
  • We recognize that some children have abilities that are significantly advanced and need additional support to become successful lifelong learners.
  • Gifted students may need support and guidance to develop healthy and positive affective characteristics.
  • Cognitive development is enhanced within social and emotional wellness.

 

For more information on GT in the Hayden School District please contact:

 

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The following are documents that lay out the general framework for how a student is identified as Gifted & Talented (GT) per the NW BOCES WEBSITE — please contact the school for more specific information:

Sample Forms from NW BOCES GT

Gifted and Talented Resources

Websites with resources for teachers, parents, and students: